The Photographer

Justin Davanzo has been a photographer all his life…he just didn’t realize it until 12 years ago.  The eyes through which he sees the world are a throwback to the early 20th Century photographers who were simply documenting life on the street as they saw it.  The term for this was flâneur and literally meant “to wander without a goal, at random; to move forward without hurrying.”  These chance encounters whilst wandering with a camera gave new life to the world around.  Justin’s way of seeing the world is better summed up by Peter Galassi, the chief curator in the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York as he points out the particular style of flâneur photographers, the likes of Cartier-Bresson, Robert Doisneau, and Marc Riboud as such: “…wandering the streets without destination, but with a premeditated alertness for the unexpected detail that will release a marvelous and compelling reality just beneath the banal surface of ordinary experience.”  Through Justin’s flâneur style of photography, we begin to see all things in a new light from the every day items we pass by on a daily basis to the well designed forms we all know so well.  Justin brings a relaxed awareness to his process and to the finished product by constantly staying attuned to the dynamic environments in order to elicit a split second observational response that sets his photos apart.  Even the welcome challenge of a planned photo subject or commercial shoot is looked at from the same philosophy.  By not constricting his creative vision to a particular outcome, the photos that evolve from any session find their voice through a sense of intense focus and organic movement.  Often the photographic results are completely unexpected yet perfectly planned.  When all the elements come together during a photo walk or shoot, time is no longer an element and the outcome is a collision of time and space through the split second intuitive trust of the wandering photographer.